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VOLUME CXXxXI

FEBRUARY 5, 1927

NUMBER 2514

tHE

, AMERICAN ,

ARCHITECT

FOUNDED 1876

THE ARCHITECT AND THE SMALL HOUSE By Cart A. Zirecter, A. I. A. Illustrated by recent work by the Author

THE problem of how to build a successful small house is undoubt- edly one that interests more people than any other phase of the build- ing industry. Bright, young business men, newly wed perhaps, me- chanics grown gray at their crafts, married couples who have saved out of the monthly wage just enough to build a

small home of their own, have all burned much midnight oil over this, to them, important problem. The American Institute of Architects has estab-

VILLAGE OF LOG HOUSES IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

A SUBURBAN PHILADELPHIA HOUSE

(Copyright, 1927, The Architectural 6 Building Press, Inc.)

lished a ‘‘Small House Service Bureau’ and many corporations deal- ing in building materials have issued booklets on the subject, in an en- deavor to improve the architectural character of the small houses which are springing up on every hand and which some- how do not seem to im- prove in spite of all that is being done in their in-

terest by architects and architectural organizations. When we consider the fact that a well designed small house costs no more than the very ugly ones

THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT

ARCHITECT

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which we see on every hand, there must be some ex- planation for the bad taste displayed, and it cer- tainly is the duty of the architectural profession to find the cause and apply the remedy.

At the last convention of The American Institute of Architects it was stated that perhaps 50,000 small houses per year have been erected since 1920 and not five per cent of these were designed by architects. This lets the architect out, insofar as responsibility for the design of these buildings is concerned, but a moral responsibility still rests with the profession to assist the small home builder to achieve better results, if only to save our self respect.

Have you ever travelled westward with a for- eigner fresh from abroad and tried to answer his questions about American housing conditions as the said conditions are revealed day by day from the train window? Can anything be more discouraging to the discerning mind than the acres of small houses one sees while passing through any of the larger cities in the United States?

The squalor of the workingmen’s houses is bad enough, God wot, but these are far less offensive than the illiterate attempts at Italian and Spanish villas on twenty-five foot lots or Wizard of Ozz bungalow effects that seem so popular in certain sec- tions of the country.

The foreigner seems to understand the possible necessity of the rows of miners and foundry work: ers houses around such cities as Pittsburgh, but that we should spend ten to twenty thousand dol-

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lars on such hideously ugly structures as one sees in almost any suburban section, is quite beyond his comprehension.

Lack of funds is always the excuse offered, if one is interested enough to investigate the reason for such bad architecture as is displayed in this type of house, but in most cases a well proportioned struc- ture, of the same area, and with much more logical ornamentation would have cost less. It is lack of intellect and not lack of funds that is responsible for the sad failures that occur so frequently in small house construction, for no structure is so small that it cannot have at least proper proportions.

The writer accidentally discovered an old iron furnace in Western Pennsylvania that had long since been abandoned. Near it were the old log cabins of the former workers, a dozen or more, each with a large stone chimney at the end. Each of these cabins contained only one or two rooms, but the propor- tion of the mass and the logical handling of the materials made one feel at once a sense of beauty even in so primitive a group of houses. The angle of the roofs was just right and the lumber was used as wood should be used and not in imitation of some other material, which by the way, seems to be one of the pet hobbies of the modern builder of small houses. The chimneys on this particular group of log cabins were built of stones gathered in the adjoining fields, laid up in solid fashion to form substantial stacks that would withstand the Winter gales and not anemic little things that would

HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA.

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be thrown down by the gale were they not sup- ported by the timbers of the building.

The modern method of laying four inches of brick around a terra cotta flue lining has robbed the modern small house of one feature that is about as important as the nose is to the average face, for all that is necessary to make the simplest form of habi- tation beautiful is a generous chimney of pleasing line, attached to a reasonably well proportioned mass, covered by a roof of the proper pitch. No other embellishment is really necessary and the variety of combinations obtainable is without number.

Although the building of well proportioned small houses seems to have become a lost art, there is sufficient evidence to show that this was not al- ways so in thiscountry. Anyone who will wander along the roads of Maryland and Virginia will find frequent examples of well designed small houses, many of them such as the old slave quarters, of the very simplest type of construction. Very little dis- secting is necessary to find the secret of their beauty and in almost every case the principles enumerated above will be found to cover all the elements of their design,—a well proportioned mass, a chimney of generous proportions and good roof pitches.

Avoiding these simple rules, the modern small home builder, whether he employs an architect or not, approaches the matter from just the opposite direction. The object seems to be to compress or squeeze into as small a compass as possible the mul- tiplicity of things that go to make up the pretentious

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house, both utilitarian and esthetic, and to do this all the laws of proportion and order are forgotten and the result might be described as a sort of archi- tectural indigestion.

In addition to the question of form we must also consider the very important one of color. ‘This should be a very simple matter for the small home builder, as an ordinary weathered shingle roof over white clapboards, rubble stonework, or run of the kiln red brick gives as fine a color scheme as anyone could desire, and with it a splendid texture. Perhaps it is because these very satisfactory effects can be obtained so cheaply that the operative builder and the misled small home owner go in for red hot roofs over mustard colored stucco with sky blue window frames and green sash.

Of course, the mistake lies in attempting to make the little home a small sized edition of some great mansion, the result of which is always ostentatious. What we need in order to make the suburban sec- tions beautiful are groups of small houses with pleasing mass, well pitched roofs, and large chim- neys and very few other prominent features; such houses as our forefathers built several centuries ago; and the addition of modern conveniences need not spoil their appearance. When we have these, we will not need to be ashamed as we approach our cities. with strangers from abroad, however small the hab- itations may be.

On the bright side of this question it may be said that the average small home builder is paying con-

HOUSE OF MRS. JOSHUA SMITH, EAST WASHINGTON LANE, GERMANTOWN, PA

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HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA

HOUSE AT ABINGTON, PA.

CARL A. ZIEGLER. ARCHITECT

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HOUSE ON LOCUST AVENUE, GERMANTOWN, PA ENTRANCE DETAIL. HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA

HOUSE OF MRS. JOSHUA SMITH, EAST WASHINGTON LANE, GERMANTOWN, PA

CARL A. ZIEGLER, ARCHITECT

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LIVING ROOM, HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA. CARL A. ZIEGLER, ARCHITECT

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siderable more attention to the question of design and is following the operative builder less. My own impression is that there is just as much good taste among those who build small houses as there is among those who build the more pretentious ones, but as the small house can never be profitable to the architect, the subject has been more or less avoided by the better offices, which is a great pity as we need the contribution of all of our best men in order to solve the small house problem.

In some circles the designing of small houses is referred to with a certain amount of condescension, but after thirty years of general practice, the writer is of the opinion that it is much more difficult to design a charming small house than it is to create a pretentious dwelling with all its accessories.

Restraint is a difficult attainment for most people, especially for those with creative minds, but re- straint is a quality that must be exercised in the de- signing of small houses if they are to convey a sense of well being and refinement.

2m JOSEPH CONRAD MEMORIAL

A MEMORIAL to Joseph Conrad is to be erected as an addition to the village hall, Bishopsbourne, between Folkestone and Canterbury, England. Mr. Conrad lived for some time at Bishopsbourne, and OLD SLAVE QUARTERS IN VIRGINIA died there.

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TRAVELING WITH A FOUNTAIN PEN—IV

By Irvinc K. Ponp, F.A.LA. Past President, THz AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

ALTHOUGH the colored inks used in my youth- ful ventures into the field of art served to clothe and environ my Japanese maidens richly and vividly, yet I fear they could not have done justice to the flowers which everywhere are strewn in the path of the winter cruisers. Here even the fountain pen was impotent to do more than record an outline of form and masses of light and shade. The fountain pen is a product of the West; it is at core a Greek. Color comes out of the East, though it has made itself at home in the West; more so than form has in the East. Color adorned our path from Madeira to Kew Gardens. Madeira gave us the purple Bougainvillza, the scarlet Poinsetta, the tender lavender of the Wis- taria, and the golden tongued, ivory cupped, Calla lily. Kew gave us the gorgeous Rhododendron path and the wonderful Azaleas. Andalusia and North Africa blossomed forth in pink almonds and fruited in purple black olives among the soft gray greens. Sicily gleamed in golden fruit and darker green, and Paris spread out her gorgeous carpets of multi- colored Tulips. Everywhere were the soft mystic colors of burgeoning Spring—giving rare vistas through the middle ground into the beyond and clothing the beyond in a poignant charm. The prophecy might never meet fulfillment but the promise was alluring. The ferns, the palms, the cy- press trees, only speak of the beyond by insisting on the present. One may look around these objects; he cannot look through them. Their fantastic shapes, however, lend character to the here and now, while the rose purple mountains of the desert are more rose

THIS OLD WELL-PUMP IN CATTARO, WHICH WAS QUITE

purple and mysterious because of their dark insistent greens in the foreground. My fingers while wield- ing the pen longed for the brush; but life was too strenuous to permit of the general use of that soft and sensitive implement. So let me continue with the pen.

When we reached Gibraltar on our outward course, it was in the silver gray of the morning.

A wee bd- cherch

Cadaro

——_———

THIS DIMINUTIVE CHURCH WAS BACKED UP BY THE

BLACK MASS WHICH GIVES THIS REGION THE NAME OF

MONTENEGRO. THREE BELLS IN THE ARCHES AT THE PEAK OF THE GABLE DEFINE THE OCCUPANCY

The bugles were calling to action and the marine bands were playing the British National Anthem on the decks of many warships; for the “‘Fleet’’ was at anchor in the Bay preparatory to manoeuvers in the Mediterranean. We reached Toulon in the mists of an early, rainy morning, and there in the harbor lying at anchor were the mighty vessels of the French Fleet. I am not a pacifist in the objectional sense of the term, and in the sense employed by pacifists themselves the term is objectionable to most of us, yet my reaction upon viewing at close range these mighty engines of war was one of pained dis- gust with mankind for not having been able after all these centuries of experience, to find a sane way of solving individual, local, racial, national and in- ternational problems. The thing to me looked like a huge sad joke. Said the small boy in the “‘Zoo.”’ “Father, I'll bet God laughed when he made mon- keys!’’ Viewing the race and its manner of hand- ling religion and politics; of formulating and deal- ing with the relationships of Man to God, and Man to Man, I am constrained to echo in a measure the

IN SCALE WITH THE MOUNTAINS, WAS WITHIN A QUAINT : ; , “7? WROUGHT IRON ENCLOSURE, WHICH I DID NoT stop To | Mood and words of the boy and say, “I'll bet God MEASURE AND DETAIL laughed—a sardonic laugh—when he made men! 143

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THE LITTLE BOATS FROM THE PORT OF CAPRI COME BOBBING OUT IN HASTE TO GREET US AND TO BEAR US INTO THE PLUE GROTTO

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I LOOKED UP FROM THE BOOK STALLS ACROSS THE SEINE AND SAID: I'LL PAY MY COMPLIMENTS FOR A MOMENT TO OUR LADY ACROSS THE WAY. I STOPPED WITH HER NAMESAKE IN JERUSA- LEM

AND THEN AS SPAIN VAN ISHES INTO THE MISTS WE OVERHAUL VESSELS OF THE GRAND FLEET MAKING FOR ANCHOR ON THE PORTSMOUTH TIDE. WE CAN ALMOST RECOG- NIZE SIR JOSEPH PORTER, K. C. B.

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I have recollections of a rather melancholy Venice when I visited it in the Fall of Nineteen hundred and eleven on the occasion of an international con- gress of architects held in that city and in Rome in that year. Shops seemed deserted by natives and tourists alike. A sea saltiness encrusted the marbles and tiles which were so brilliant when I spent weeks sketching in Calle and Canalle early in Eighteen eighty-four. But on this recent visit color seemed to have been restored to normal; the shops were

LOVELY SYRACUSE IS GUARDED FROM THE SEA BY THIS DOUR MASS OF FORTIFICATION AND ATTENDANT STRUC- TURES

bustling with shoppers and money was being freely spent. The spirit of New Italy was manifesting it- self, and Venice seemed prosperous. Sad or gay Venice is beautiful—in charm and character unique. But whose last words may be applied with equal fitness to any one of a number of ports of call; Cattaro on its lovely land-locked sea; Syracuse with its relics of the past and balcony life of the present; Palermo with its golden mosaics and protecting mountain flanks; Naples teeming with interest be- neath the fluttering banner of Vesuvius, and in its cleanliness and order and freedom from beggars and mendicants so different from the Naples I had known over two score years ago. I had promised cruise-mates who were complaining of the beggars in Cairo that they should see the real thing in Naples; but the promise could not be fulfilled; for the Italian towns, at least those we visited, and it was said the condition is general, are as free of beggars and those who parade deformity as Constantinople is free of dogs. Whether the breed was eliminated in the same manner I was not told. Naples in the early eighties was distress- ing. In the year Nineteen twenty-six it was fascinat- ing. From the moment I stepped on deck in the early morning till I took ship some days later at midnight and watched the boat cast off I was sur- rounded by beauty and bathed in romance. In that first minute on deck I cast my eyes up over the har- bor shipping to St. Malo on the hilltop. Before three minutes had passed my fountain pen had fixed

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the scene on paper and in my mind. Rather a nice sort of traveling companion, the fountain pen, is it not? Always ready to go your way without tears or argument and willing to shed its last drop in your service! Constantinople having rid itself of her dogs, and Italy of her beggars, Egypt might banish her flies—that super-pest which is more pes- tiferous than her other pests ancient or modern. Vis- itors to Egypt swat the flies; but the natives have come to take them philosophically. ‘““What’s the use!"’ That spirit calming or sense deadening phil- osophy, as you choose to take it, prevails among all Orientals (all who do not sell ‘‘fly swatters’’) and it seems not to disturb the Egyptian to have his infant peer up at him through dense rings of flies as through grotesque horn rimmed spectacles.

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OVER ACROSS THE BAY VESUVIUS THREATENS WITH ITS SMOKE PLUME—BUT NO ONE SEEMS PERTURBED

I speak of this in this connection for, no matter how altruistically inclined your fountain pen may be, flies, especially the flies of Egypt, may sometimes make its workings well nigh impossible. The Wind God is the only power which can rout the pests— the Sun God is their friend; as he is the friend and Father of all living things.

At Naples, at Toulon and Gibraltar many cruise- mates left the ship for tours upon the continent. I remained on board to rest up from the strenuous Mediterranean part of the cruise. I bade farewell to the British crouching lion, to Africa and to Spain as we sailed through the straits and out into the broad Atlantic where we overhauled ships of the Fleet which, having manoeuvered, were returning home to England. The Bay of Biscay which I had dread- ed was as calm as a mill pond, and on its waters the Samaria stood steady. I would not have believed it. On a Sunday morning we sighted Cherbourg and there with a considerable party of friends, for we had become friends after two months of close companionship, I disembarked and took the boat train for Paris. I have landed at that port in mid-

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MY HURRYING COMPAN- IONS WAITED PATIENTLY SOME ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN SECONDS WHILE I MADE THIS BIT SKETCH. I HAD TO FORE- SHORTEN THE FLECHE TO GET IT ON THE PA- PER. I DISLIKE, HOW- EVER, UNNECESSARILY TO MUTILATE AN OLD MON- UMENT

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ONE HAD ONLY TO LEAN UP AGAINST A TREE OR POST AND LIFT HIS EYES, AND SPRING-CLAD PARIS REVEALED HERSELF IN LOVELINESS TO HIM. I! | SAW A REAL JULIET AT

THIS GATE. PERHAPS THAT’S WHY I STOPPED THERE . ~~ it? 2m » { Fast aN AP ui 9re fromthe 29 Juuet Gare \ RUE DERIVEL Pary 147

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THE FOREGROUND OF THIS SCENE GLOWED WITH A GORGEOUS DIS- PLAY OF TULIPS. THE TIP OF THE EIFFEL TOWER PEEPED OVER THE UPPER LEFT HAND CORNER OF THE ARCH TO ENJOY THE COLORFUL PATTERNS

The EastGR FLOWER) Phace du Carrouse/ Pars looking west,

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I SQUANDERED FIFTEEN DELIGHTFUL MINUTES WATCHING MY FOUNTAIN PEN PUT THIS ON PAPER WHEN I MIGHT HAVE BEEN WITH OTHER TOUR- ISTS IN THE SHOPS ASK- ING THE PRICE OF BEADS!

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“ON THE AIR” FROM PARIS TO LONDON. FLY- ING LOW OVER FRANCE, BECAUSE OF A FOG WHICH WAS BLOWING IN, I SKETCHED AT FAIRLY CLOSE RANGE. AT TIMES WE COULD GET THE EX- PRESSIONS ON THE FACES OF THE VILLAGERS WHOSE CHURCH SPIRES WE ALL BUT SCRAPED

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THIS SCREEN IN THE COURTYARD OF THE BEAUX-ARTS IMPRESSED ME LONG YEARS AGO; BUT NEVER TILL NOW DID I GET A CHANCE TO CARRY A‘VAY MORE THAN A MEMORY OF IT

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Summer, in the Autumn, and now in the unfolding life of Spring. In which phase the beautiful coun- tryside of France is the more appealing I can hardly say. Perhaps the Springtide, here as elsewhere, be- cause of the promise it holds; but that is outside the superficial aspect. I dreaded oft visited Paris, this time, as I had dreaded unvisited Venice two score and more years ago. But soon I loved it as I came to love that Venice of old; and, as with that Venice, left it with reluctance and poignant regret. A sad-

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ness seemed to hover over Paris. The effects of the war were visible in the faces and on the persons of so many. But there were poise and calmness through it all. Sarah Bernhardt did a wonderful thing psy- chologically for the French. She conquered mutila- tion; and those of her own sex and of the opposite who have similarly suffered, love her and worship her almost as a Patron Saint.

It was hard to keep the fountain pen from draw- ing too heavily on one’s time in Paris; pictures there were in whichever or whatever direction one looked. The color, ranging from the tender to the gorgeous, called for the painter’s kit; but limited time said, ‘““Nay!’’ On Easter Monday, while Paris was awak- ening to a new social life, I reluctantly yet eagerly boarded an airship out at Le Bourget and sailed over the Channel to London, landing safely at Croydon in the midst of bank holiday outers. Tinney were outside the fence fortunately. On this crossing the airship simulated the Samaria in the Bay of Biscay and was steady as steady could be. Besides study- ing the terrain, (the Channel was obscured from vision for the greater part of the time by a dense fog which we avoided by traveling at a high alti- tude), | wrote a letter and made two sketches; one, two or three hundred feet in the air over France where we flew low to avoid the clouds, the other over England at a height of about a thousand feet, as the skies had cleared and fog and cloud were floating eastward over the Channel. The difference in the terrain of the two countries is marked. The color was much the same, for the budding Spring

> was tinting both surfaces alike, but the make-ups were individual. In France the cultivated plots were rectangular and defined seemingly only by the plant- ing and the color of the crops: plow furrow or small ditch but faintly marking the borders. In England hardly a regular shaped piece of ground— all shapes, like a dissected map—the borders marked by streams, tortuous ditches, stone rows, hedges and fences. In France the houses were simple individu- ally but cluttered hit or miss in the villages and hamlets. In England the houses were in tortured shapes regularly set in the orderly plan of the towns. Now and then in the English wooded landscape could be seen the layout of some charming country estate with gardens and lawns and roadways and clustered out-buildings. Garden landscaping can be

A FRAGMENT CUT OUT OF

THE DETAIL OF THE NEAR AND FAR IN TIME AND SPACE

MIGHTY CLIFF GIVES A

well studied from the air. The plane seemed to its passengers to be all but quiescent, but when we saw our shadow gliding over the landscape leaving in its wake slow beetle-like moving auto cars and trains doing forty miles an hour, we knew that we were moving swiftly. I need not ask a smoother, swifter channel passage, for I shall not get it.

The airship has landed us safely in England and there we sense a spirit which is not alien to us, nor yet is it absolutely akin to us, but toward which we extend a sympathy which is to be aroused in no other foreign land. The speech of England much resembles our own, and without too great effort, or the intercession of an interpreter, we may make our wants known and approach as nearly to a mutual understanding as is possible between two separate peoples on this terrestrial ball.

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AEOLIAN BUILDING, FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK—-WARREN & WETMORE, ARCHITECTS

AWARDED 1926 FIRST PRIZE BY FIFTH AVENUE ASSOCIATION

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BERNHARDT E. MULLER, ARCHITECT

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HOUSE OF GEORGE A. ALLSOPP, JR., SOUTH ORANGE, N. J.—ARTHUR N. STARIN, ARCHITECT

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HOUSE OF CHARLES SHICK, SEAGIRT, N. J.—WM. W. SLACK & SON, ARCHITECTS

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The

imerican Institute of Architects and the New ersey Society of Architects)

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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 159

MANSE, WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, BLOOMFIELD, N. J.—J. F. CAPEN, ARCHITECT

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 161

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HOUSE OF A. K. BOURNE, GREENS FARMS, CONN. GOODWILLIE & MORAN, ARCHITECTS

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Insti- tute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 163

HOUSE OF JAMES GORDON, SHORT HILLS, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT

ENTRANCE DETAIL, HOUSE OF STANLEY HAGERMAN, MAPLEWOOD, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 165

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HOUSE OF ALFRED F. ROBERTSHAW, EDGE HILL GARDENS, PA.—WM. W. SLACK & SON, ARCHITECTS

HOUSE OF EDGAR S. BAMBERGER, WEST ORANGE, N. J CLIFFORD C. WENDEHACK, ARCHITECT

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 167

HOUSE OF CHARLES D. RAFFERTY, FISHERS ISLAND, N. Y.—C. W. FAIRWEATHER, ARCHITECT

BATHING PAVILION AND CASINO ON GULF OF MEXICO, VENICE-NOKOMIS, FLA.—SEYMOUR WILLIAMS, ARCHITECT

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 169

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CASS GILBERT, ARCHITECT

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Insti- tute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

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HOUSE OF FREDERICK C. FORD, LENOX ROAD, SUMMIT, N. J ARTHUR N. STARIN. ARCHITECT

HOUSE OF THOMAS H. FROTHINGHAM, FAR HILLS, N. J JOHN RUSSELL POPE, ARCHITECT (Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of

Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 173

J.—C. W. FAIRWEATHER, ARCHITECT

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HOUSE OF MRS. A. T. VON SCHMID, MONTCLAIR, N. J.—HOLMES & VON SCHMID, ARCHITECTS

under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., Jersey Society of Architects)

February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 175

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GARDEN FRONT, HOUSE OF WARREN MacEVOY, SOUTH ORANGE, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT

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HOUSE OF THEODORE WIDMAYER, SHORT HILLS, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 177

I ' CAMDEN COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL, LAKELAND, N. J.—ARNOLD H. MOSES, ARCHITECT i = 4 i | | | ' ; THE OLD LADIES’ HOME, PATERSON, N. J.—HARRY T. STEPHENS, ARCHITECT '

(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J.

, under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects)

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EDITORIAL

COMMENT

‘In these times of labor troubles and building ac- tivity in England,”’ writes T. S. Tait in a recent is- sue of The Architects’ Journal of London, “‘it is as essential for every architect and draftsman in this country to pay a visit to America to study modern buildings and methods of erection, as it was in the past to visit the Continent to study ancient archi- tecture.”

This frank acknowledgment of our progressive building methods and the high development of architectural design in this country will be read with satisfaction by every American architect. To sub- stantiate the truthfulness of his conclusions, Mr. Tait points out various examples. He cites a num- ber of our tall buildings, setting forth in days the time consumed in their erection, and contrasts the speed with the best records in England. ‘“What,” he asks, ‘“‘makes it possible to work with such expe- dition?’’ While he believes that contractors have reduced their operations to a matter of efficiency of organization and an ability to carry forward every branch of the work with the utmost of co-ordina- tion, he finds on investigation,—for he came to America solely to investigate these conditions,— that much of our high speed in building is due to the fine organization of architects’ offices in this coun- try. Mr. Tait expresses his admiration of this effi- ciency of architectural organization, and exclaims in surprise, stating “In one large office in Chicago they employ thirty mechanical draftsmen alone, and this does not include steelwork designers.”

It is interesting to note the point of view of the English architect with reference to the relation of the quantity surveyor to building. There have been many who stoutly maintain the opinion that we should inaugurate a system of quantity survey sim- ilar to the English